A Quick Comment on the Draft by Somebody Smarter Than Me

The 2010 MLB Amateur draft began on Monday with the Washington Nationals taking Bryce Harper number one overall.  Of all the drafts held by all the major sports, none is more labour intensive, random, and just plain long than that of baseball.  The 30 MLB teams selected 1,525 players in 50 rounds held over three days.  If the past is any indication, a very large majority of these kids will never sniff the major leagues.  But if the past is an indicator, there also might be just as much of a chance for James Rice (selected 1,525th overall by the Yankees) to make an impact as for Christian Colon (4th overall by KC).

The Blue Jays ended up with 56 draft picks and used the majority of them to select pitchers (32).  Toronto’s first pick (11th overall) was used to select Deck McGuire, a pitcher from Georgia Tech.  A few notable names from the rest of Anthopoulos’ selections include Dickie Thon Jr, son of former major league all star Dickie Thon, and Ricky Romero’s younger brother Gabriel. 

Now I won’t lie to you.  I do not know much about any of the players selected by the Jays.  I have no comment on whether or not they made sound selections.  I have absolutely no idea whether any of the players will be major league stars or if they’ll last as long in the professional ranks as I did (zero days for all of you counting). 

But luckily, 500 Level Fan knows a man who does hold some insight.  Ottawa correspondent Future Star, also known as WCF (for Willie Canate Fan), was kind enough to send a write-up into the site about one player he was particularly pleased the Jays grabbed – Omar Cotto:

One of the under-the-radar names selected by Toronto in the Rule 4 amateur draft was Omar Cotto.  One of the top Puerto Rican prospects in the draft, the Jays were drafted him in the 12th round (366th overall).  In some ways, Cotto is the typical high school aged player with undeveloped power, contact skills and defence. What makes Cotto unique is his speed, which rates as plus-plus.  In the later rounds, it probably makes sense to take athletic players with one major-league tool and leave it to the player development system to try to coax out other skills.  This appears to be the team’s current strategy (22 high school picks in the first 30 rounds) and it marks a major departure from draft day under JP Ricciardi.  Ricciardi preferred to use the middle rounds to draft college seniors, more complete players perhaps, but often players without any real high-end potential.  How fast is Cotto?  Well, another Jays draft pick, Dickie Thon Jr. is known for his blazing speed, and is the reigning 200m track champion in Puerto Rico.  On the diamond, Omar Cotto is faster.  He has sprinter speed on the basepaths. 

Cotto’s hitting skills are raw, especially from the left side of the plate, and it isn’t clear how much power he will develop.  As it stands, Cotto likely has a chance to developing into a solid, speedy CF in the mold of Dave Martinez, flashing 10-15 HR power in a good year.  The Jays will have to take their time with Cotto, he should start next season in extended spring training and make his debut with the Gulf Coast League Jays in summer, 2011.

Thanks to Future Star for his insight (notice how he threw a reference to Dave Martinez in there, another one of his favourites).  I owe you a beer pal.

For insight on other Blue Jays players and prospects check out Jays Prospects.

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